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Could J-Pop have become as big globally as K-Pop?


Feanor

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Japan is a master of "soft power", and many of its cultural aspects (anime, manga, Nintendo/Playstation, Japanese cuisine) are loved by audiences all around the world. And while Japan has been a top 2 music market in the world for literally decades, J-Pop is still quite local to Japan, which is in stark contrast to K-Pop, which has become a household genre on a global scale in the past 10 years or so.

 

So do you think there could've been an alternative scenario where J-Pop was as big as K-Pop globally if Japanese labels and artists had pursued a more global outlook?

 

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Honestly, no. The girlgroups make music targeted to Japanese people I feel like and their image + sound is very childish. I'm talking about the idol groups like AKB48, Nogizaka46 and of that vein. Solo acts like Utada and Namie for example, yes. 

 

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I feel like only certain, selective anime songs could get big globally. Like Oshi no Ko's Idol by Yoasobi or JJK's Lost In Paradise by Aklo.

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10 minutes ago, Feanor said:

Japan is a master of "soft power", and many of its cultural aspects (anime, manga, Nintendo/Playstation, Japanese cuisine) are loved by audiences all around the world.

and this is why J-Pop won't ever reach past its borders. There are better places for Japan to focus is soft power strategies that show greater returns and those better places draw audiences that alienate regular music listeners.

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K-Pop made an effort to appeal to global audiences and make their music accessible to the world while Japan is still living in 1998. 

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Well, Namie was going somewhere with the Golden Touch MV gaining like 10M views in several months or something, but then it got deleted, and she kinda stopped caring about the international recognition, and we know what happened next. And this is just one example of self-sabotage.

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Kpop groups cater to global audience (tours/provide subtitles to everything...) while jpop simply doesn't.

 

I really want to get into jpop, but it's kinda hard to get into.

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8 minutes ago, Taylena said:

K-Pop made an effort to appeal to global audiences and make their music accessible to the world while Japan is still living in 1998. 

Not westernizing your culture is considered still living in the 90's? :deadbanana2:

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Utada Hikaru and Kyary Pamyu Pamyu:clap:

 

Also, Mariya Takeuchi had a globally-viral hit song, right? 

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20 minutes ago, Sailor Moon said:

Kpop groups cater to global audience (tours/provide subtitles to everything...) while jpop simply doesn't.

 

I really want to get into jpop, but it's kinda hard to get into.

Kpop didn't use to 

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maybe Utada Hikaru

 

but no the rest of the industry is too weird for westerners 

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no, Japan is very culturally specific and to be honest I love that about Japan. K-pop just rips off western music, it's not interesting

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Back in the 2000s there were a lot of acts who had global appeal (Utada, One Ok Rock, Crystal Kay). A lot of the music were US rip-offs, but some artists blended in traditional J-pop and created a sound that was exotic but familiar. J-pop was bigger and more credible than Kpop back then.  In the 2010s they got overshadowed by Korea. and their music became more niche. They also never really adapted to the digital space in an effort to protect physicals sales.  J-pop acts even being on Spotify nowadays is a huge leap from where they were.  

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J-pop was just hard af to find thru youtube compared to k-pop and still is

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Jpop was a thing in the west before kpop happened (although never this mainstream obviously), but the global appeal would never happen because the market never really cared to expand the genre beyond Japan.

 

Jpop acts are able to sell millions of records and sell hundreds of thousands of concert tickets nationwide, and that was never realistic in South Korea with kpop. That's why kpop acts were trying very hard to get into the japanese market since the early 2000s

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Idk if it's licensing or something but a lot of J-pop is hard to find on YouTube and streaming 

 

also it's an image thing, K-pop idols are cutting edge and fashion forward, offering more concept etc. with catchy music. Kyary Pamyu Pamyu was IT for a bit and would probably be even bigger today with Tik tok, but I haven't really seen any other J-pop acts pop off since

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Yasutaka Nakata should be bigger than Max Martin, that's all I know

 

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It took me like 10 years of being a k-pop stan to finally get into the 48 / 46 series j-pop girl groups.

 

So yeah, I would say that they are quite an acquired taste, because they don't aim to appeal to anyone other than Japanese market which is enough to sustain them already unlike k-pop. 


J-pop has already become a lot more  k-pop-fied in recent years (which is ironic because idol k-pop was birthed from j-pop), I wouldn't want to see it lose what makes it unique

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