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What isn't weird in your culture but weird in US culture?


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Praising a baby/a child for their beauty, saying that they're handsome or pretty here is normal and acceptable without any PDF connotations, it doesn't have to be that. Seems like this is tricky/sensitive if you say it on the Internet on US media? :skull:

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I live in the US so it’s a little bit of an inverted response, but — my understanding is that in Latin America, families kiss each other as a greeting. Well I’m mixed race (half black half Latino) and on my Mexican American side of the family, we kiss each other hello and goodbye. Other Americans tend to find that custom weird. And I don’t do it with my black side of the family. I mean I guess when you’re young your mom will kiss your forehead or whatever but that stops by grade school. But to this day I kiss my cousins, aunts, and grandma everytime I see them 

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Also an inverted response, but one of my friends in college had a Korean foreign exchange student for a roommate who was the biggest sweetheart, and she would make some comments asking if we had eaten today, etc..

 

I understand it’s commonplace in some Asian countries and meant in goodwill, but it was so jarring to hear and respond to here. :deadbanana4:

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5 minutes ago, WeFoundTrouble said:

I live in the US so it’s a little bit of an inverted response, but — my understanding is that in Latin America, families kiss each other as a greeting. Well I’m mixed race (half black half Latino) and on my Mexican American side of the family, we kiss each other hello and goodbye. Other Americans tend to find that custom weird. And I don’t do it with my black side of the family. I mean I guess when you’re young your mom will kiss your forehead or whatever but that stops by grade school. But to this day I kiss my cousins, aunts, and grandma everytime I see them 

Interesting. You kiss them on the cheek right? We also have that custom but it's mostly older women who do it.

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Just now, Sesame said:

Also an inverted response, but one of my friends in college had a Korean foreign exchange student for a roommate who was the biggest sweetheart, and she would make some comments asking if we had eaten today, etc..

 

I understand it’s commonplace in some Asian countries and meant in goodwill, but it was so jarring to hear and respond to here. :deadbanana4:

I'm Asian so this is VERY common and not weird at all :rip:  We're just being polite. Most of the time it's just small talk. I'd imagine it's like how the Brits ask how the weather is.

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Milk in plastic bags is one cultural shock for some Americans. Also people knowing the difference between a country and a continent.

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3 minutes ago, Before Today said:

I'm Asian so this is VERY common and not weird at all :rip:  We're just being polite. Most of the time it's just small talk. I'd imagine it's like how the Brits ask how the weather is.

Yeah, it was just an interesting cultural intersect. Americans will typically ask someone how their day is going, but never get down to specifics, especially things like whether or not people ate since we probably don’t actually care. I mean, how do you respond when someone tells you no? 

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A lot of things people said are really normal in so many places

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7 minutes ago, Sesame said:

Yeah, it was just an interesting cultural intersect. Americans will typically ask someone how their day is going, but never get down to specifics, especially things like whether or not people ate since we probably don’t actually care. I mean, how do you respond when someone tells you no? 

In Greece they'll feed you :cm: ALOT

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Wearing other culture’s clothing. In my country we even have a day to celebrate the cultural diversity by having kids wear cultural outfits from other ethnicities to school. This would be seen as cultural appropriation in the US. 

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10 minutes ago, Sesame said:

Yeah, it was just an interesting cultural intersect. Americans will typically ask someone how their day is going, but never get down to specifics, especially things like whether or not people ate since we probably don’t actually care. I mean, how do you respond when someone tells you no? 

It's just small talk. When Americans say how are you, they actually don't care/expect a full story. It's our version of asking how are you. If you say no, they'll probably just nod or ask another small talk question like why. But it'll end there

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I’m Canadian, but I’m of East African descent.  
 

In our culture, it’s very common to great someone who visits your house with a hug and/or kiss on the check. That’s probably something that’s considered very weird in America :rip:

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30 minutes ago, Before Today said:

Interesting. You kiss them on the cheek right? We also have that custom but it's mostly older women who do it.

For me it’s cheeks yeah, I can’t speak for Latin American countries so I’m not sure if they’re ok with lip kissing family members or not but I’ll say that -that- would be seen as unusual by us if that were the case, since we’re not exposed to it daily. But I don’t treat other customs as “weird” personally, and I’m always open to seeing how other cultures differ from mine.

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The belief that everyone shouldn’t have to choose death or lifetime of debt in case of a medical emergency. 

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16 minutes ago, WeFoundTrouble said:

For me it’s cheeks yeah, I can’t speak for Latin American countries so I’m not sure if they’re ok with lip kissing family members or not but I’ll say that -that- would be seen as unusual by us if that were the case, since we’re not exposed to it daily. But I don’t treat other customs as “weird” personally, and I’m always open to seeing how other cultures differ from mine.

Cheeks I see a lot between families and even close friends, however lip to lip to me seems weird af, maybe because I'm in nurse school and I can't tell you the amount of nasty ass mouths that go along with their viruses and bacteria infecting babies and small children :deadbanana4:

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im filipino-american and one of the biggest weird things for me (i grew up with both cultures so no culture shock per say) is how americans are so weirded out by the mano mano which is like putting your forehead on the elderlys or lolo/lola/abuela's palm and the kissing of the cheek, i even kiss my parents on the lips when i was a kid... here in the US it gets sexualized as hell like with tom brady and his son.

 

another thing is that americans get so weirded out but eventually love how i always ask if they've eaten, where they wanna eat and how i always treat them out. its part of filipino culture (and latino by extension i think) to just feed people and make them feel cozy/at home. oh and as much as possible i pack rice in a lunch box whenever i go for fast food because i cant stand eating kfc chicken with mashed potatoes, i need my rice!

 

what ive come to learn is that americans have no sense of community (at least in urban areas) and are so hyperindividual (even i am sometimes) that they forget to be nice to the rest of the community.

 

ive been harassed at one point by strangers for just looking at them and smiling, like they're always thinking im mocking them or smth, i move between the philippines and the us frequently every semester break so i guess its just a habit ive learned from the philppines.

 

oh and HYGIENE some americans are just so reliant on deodorants they'll not wash for weeks!!! ive accidentally scraped friends arms and the nasty dark sweat/idk dirt that accumulates on their pale ass skin is so :deadbanana4:

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The relationship of parents with their children overall in the US and other western societies looks a bit cold and distant from a non-western perspective.

 

I'm in my 20s and have a great relationship with my parents, so I'd rather live with them until I'm financially stable to leave than being broke and having to share some small place with a random roommate. That's the mindset of most here in Latin America, but I guess my decision makes me look like a loser to american standards or whatever. Imagine being kicked out of the house by your own parents the second you turn 18...welp, to each their own. :deadbanana4:

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Dual national here. Some things I've noticed:

 

In Italy, kids aren't all in bed early. It's not uncommon for them to be out in the streets playing until midnight (or even later).

 

And because there are so many Italians/Italian-Americans in the States (and no, the two camps are not nearly as different as the native born care to admit), this next one might not be as weird or unknown. But in Italy, you can have an argument with somebody Karen-style and then be their best friend two seconds later at the drop of a hat. Being extremely blunt is a part of the culture in Italy, whereas, in the States, it's a major sign that you weren't raised right.

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14 minutes ago, Scars said:

The relationship of parents with their children overall in the US and other western societies looks a bit cold and distant from a non-western perspective.

 

I'm in my 20s and have a great relationship with my parents, so I'd rather live with them until I'm financially stable to leave than being broke and having to share some small place with a random roommate. That's the mindset of most here in Latin America, but I guess my decision makes me look like a loser to american standards or whatever. Imagine being kicked out of the house by your own parents the second you turn 18...welp, to each their own. :deadbanana4:

Asians also live with their parents. It's not that uncommon to live with them even if you're married and have kids. I know some couples who do that, though personally I'd move out. I'm 24 and still live with my dad :priceless: I'm lowkey thankful it's not a big deal here lol. Saving some money. And living alone is kind of lonely at times. I lived on my own when I was in college, so I'm using my time to spend some time with my parents. But I might move out and live with my bf next year which I'm excited about.

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Living with parents after 18. Very common in Asia, even until you’re married and have kids. It’s just the way family members support each other. But in the US, living with parents considered a loser and weird.

 

https://youtu.be/si1CrbCaxjM

 

At 2:16, i love his response to Oprah’s question

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Swearing a lot. I know most younger people in the US aren't averse to swearing but everybody at all ages swears in Australia.

The fu word is like nothing to us, people say it in the workplace :skull: Nevermind how ***** is just thrown around like nothing

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