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UK Politics 🇬🇧 Ready for Rish!


Diarrhoea
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As if closing language centres will help, I used to work with the Confucius Institute a lot and had positive experiences. I don’t think they are infiltrating the UK through Mandarin classes and Chinese Paper Folding classes.
 

Protecting assets is good but considering tories are parties of landlords they will do little about the number of properties being bought up by international buyers (they literally have flat viewings for buy to let only new builds for my city in Singapore and Hong Kong) as it’s quick money and they never think long term or about the working class.

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A cute looking Indian origin guy becoming the ruler of UK.. Karma came to bite Colonisers back :clap3:

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Apart from shutting down Confucius Institutes (maybe just regulate them?), I strongly support all of those :clap3:

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23 hours ago, Horizon Flame said:

 

ew she's my MP

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????????? I’m so confused

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On 8/4/2022 at 3:10 PM, Kitty Kat said:

????????? I’m so confused

The scariest part is him wanting to dismantle the 2010 equalities act because it’s “woke nonsense”.

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the US-ification of British politics is terrible :rip: maybe it's time for me to move somewhere else once again because wow

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This election taking forever

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Wth at the US forgiving [some] student debt. Can the UK follow suit pls. :jonny2:

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On 8/24/2022 at 9:00 PM, Daydream said:

Wth at the US forgiving [some] student debt. Can the UK follow suit pls. :jonny2:

The Tories would never. :gaycat6:

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I'm terrified at what's going to happen in 25 or so years when the first of the plan 2s need to start being written off. It's going to cost the country a fortune.

 

The interest is so high that no matter what your contributions are, the value of the loan barely goes down.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Will Liz Truss live up to hawkish language on China if she becomes Britain’s next prime minister?

The foreign secretary has frequently criticised Beijing and is reportedly considering labelling the country a ‘threat’ to national security

Analysts believe the front runner to succeed Boris Johnson is likely to draw a clear line under the ‘golden era’ of cooperation and investment

 

Liz Truss, the front runner to be Britain’s next prime minister, has talked tough on China. Liz Truss, the front runner to become Britain’s next prime minister, has signalled she will take a tougher stance towards China amid hardening public sentiment towards Beijing and a growing UK presence in the Indo-Pacific. Allies of Truss, who is seen as one of the most hawkish members of Boris Johnson’s cabinet, have told The Times she would classify China as “a threat” to national security – the same status as Russia – and reopen an integrated review of defence and diplomatic strategy.

 

China, which was labelled a “systemic competitor” in the March 2021 review, has dismissed the suggestion as “irresponsible talk”.

“In ordinary circumstances, I’d say the new PM would ultimately pursue a more realistic and balanced approach to foreign affairs once in office, but the UK’s reputation for pragmatic diplomacy has taken a battering in recent years,” said Jonathan Sullivan, director of China programmes at Nottingham University’s Asia Research Institute. “Labelling a major trade partner a threat would be a remarkable development, but the fact that it is not totally inconceivable speaks to the uncertainties that exist around Truss and the negative momentum that has built up around UK-China relations.”

 

Since that time, relations between Beijing and London have become icier amid growing concerns about the use of Chinese technology in key infrastructure, alleged human rights abuses in Xinjiang and the adoption of a national security law in Hong Kong.

Potentially labelling China a “threat” suggests “a very clear line is being drawn under the so-called golden era”, according to Rana Mitter, an Oxford University professor and expert on the history and politics of modern China.

 

As foreign secretary, Truss has repeatedly spoken of the need for the West to serve as a check on Beijing’s ambitions.

“By talking about the rise of China as inevitable we are doing China’s work for it,” Truss said in a Mansion House speech in April.

“In fact, their rise isn’t inevitable. They will not continue to rise if they don’t play by the rules.”

 

This summer alone, Truss has criticised Beijing over the Hong Kong national security law and summoned China’s ambassador in August to discuss what the British government said was Beijing’s “aggressive and wide-ranging escalation” against Taiwan following a historic visit by US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

 

On Thursday, Truss again challenged Beijing over what she said were “appalling human rights violations in Xinjiang” after a long-anticipated United Nations report found that China’s actions in the region, including the detention and persecution of Uygurs and members of other ethnic Muslim groups, “may constitute international crimes, in particular crimes against humanity.”

 

Meanwhile, Britain has been increasing its presence in the Indo-Pacific region in recent years as a hedge against China’s expansion, including a recent drive to increase its security and development links with Southeast Asia.

 

The departure of Johnson could lead to a “coordinated and more realistic” approach to Britain’s China policy, according to Sam Goodman, director of policy from the advocacy group Hong Kong Watch. “With his removal and Liz Truss likely to succeed him, if her rhetoric on China as foreign secretary is matched with action as prime minister, we will likely see a tougher UK-China policy, which places human rights and values above increased economic and trade ties,” he added.

 

That could include honouring the British government’s commitment this year to expand the British National (Overseas) visa programme and potentially consider sanctions against Hong Kong and Chinese officials over the national security law, as proposed by a cross-party group of British lawmakers this year, Goodman said.

 

That said, it is unlikely that a Truss-led government would seek to act alone when it comes to sanctions, Mitter said. “The interest in making common cause with other liberal allies will be a powerful motivation in making a decision,” he continued. However, any major shifts in Britain’s foreign policy may be tempered by ongoing domestic issues. Inflation has surged to a 40-year high in Britain as a cost-of-living crisis threatens to push millions into poverty. A brewing cost-of-living crisis threatens to push more than 3 million ordinary Britons into poverty, according to a new report by the Resolution Foundation think tank. Rising energy prices as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine have led to double-digit inflation in Britain, with Goldman Sachs economists predicting it could top 22 per cent next year if fuel costs continue unabated.

 

“With Truss, many things are possible. Her own position on China has really hardened over the past few years, and there is an appetite in the Tory party for all kinds of tough lines on China,” said Sullivan of the University of Nottingham. “She is also going to face a generational crisis in terms of cost of living, breakdown of public services – including a National Health Service on its last legs, strikes and poverty,” he said.

“That should preoccupy her attention, and make an antagonistic relationship with China an unwanted headache. Then again, China is every Western leader under pressure’s most expedient bogeyman, so who knows?”

 

Chad is a UK correspondent reporting on issues ranging from business to Sino-British relations. He joined the Post in 2018 as a senior business reporter focused on finance. He has previously written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires.

 

 

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Both options are literal psychopaths who are going to ruin this country. I've just totally switched off from the impending car crash at this point.

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Babes I’m so sorry to you all. I’m going to stay abroad for a few more years if my job allows it because this is a **** show. Love u all, stay strong and get protesting wherever you can x

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Liz Truss has been announced as UK’s newest prime minister beating Rishi Sunak after an 8 week long campaign with approximately 57% of the vote bearing in mind only about 0.2% of the population were able to vote. This is the UK’s 3rd prime minister in the aftermath of David Cameron’s resignation after the 2016 Brexit referendum and comes at a time when the UK faces the highest inflation in the G7 particularly in regards to soaring energy bills.


Queen Nicola coming through as always :clap3:

 

 

A look at Liz for anyone unaware:

 

 

 

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I'm surprised that 42% of Conservative voters voted for the Indian candidate.

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140k people choosing the next Prime Minister between two trash candidates. :deadbanana:

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